2016 Canal Cordon Count Report

Posted 16 Feb 2017 to News by Sarah Scannell

The numbers of people using sustainable modes of transport to travel into Dublin city centre increased further in 2016, and now accounts for over two thirds of all journeys.

According to the Canal Cordon Report 2016 published by NTA and Dublin City Council, 134,559 people travel into the city centre at peak time using bus, train, Luas, walking or cycling. This is up from 132,188 in 2015.

By contrast, the numbers of people entering the city centre by car, is down from 67,755 in 2015 to 67,442 in 2016.

This means that the gap between people using sustainable modes and non-sustainable modes of transport continues to grow. Sustainable journeys accounted for 67% of journeys in 2016, compared to 66% in 2015.

The number of sustainable journeys in 2010 was 59% and it has increased every year since.

Mode 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016
Sustainable Modes 61% 63% 64% 61% 59% 61% 62% 63% 65% 66% 67%
Car,Goods & Other 39% 37% 36% 39% 41% 39% 38% 37% 35% 34% 33%

Mode share of people crossing the Canal Cordon by sustainable modes 2006-2016

National Transport Authority Chief Executive Anne Graham said: “What we are witnessing here, not just in 2016, but over a period of the last six years or so, is a steady shift from the car to the more sustainable alternatives like public transport, cycling and walking.

“But these things don’t happen by accident, and it is thanks to the customer-focused approach of the transport operators and other public agencies including DCC and NTA, that this shift is under way.

“We have seen innovations such as Leap Card, Real Time Passenger Information, journey planner apps etc, and these when combined with investment in transport infrastructure such as Luas Cross City, more buses for Dublin Bus and Bus Éireann, and rail projects like Phoenix Park Tunnel, make public transport an increasingly attractive alternative to the car.

“To build on this momentum, we need an ambitious investment programme around bus prioritisation measures in the Dublin area, just as we need to copper-fasten investment in plans such as those for Metro North and Dart Expansion. We also need to continue to build on the success of our cycling programmes by building more cycleways and by working with DCC and the other local authorities in the area to expand the Coke Zero Bike share scheme”.

The report has been circulated to members of Dublin City Council Transport SPC for discussion at their next meeting. Data on the movement of people across the Canal Cordon has been assembled from a number of sources for this report, including:

  • Dublin City Council Canal Cordon survey
  • Dublin Bus Canal Cordon Survey
  • Iarnród Éireann Census
  • Transport Infrastructure Ireland (TII) annual census at all LUAS tram stops.

By combining these four data sources, the NTA and DCC have been able to compile a comprehensive picture of the modes of travel used by people travelling across the Canal Cordon into the City in a typical AM peak period.

Further details of methodology are contained in report.

The full report is available on our website through this link – Canal Cordon Report 2016.pdf

Merrion Street Upgrades

Posted 15 Feb 2017 to News by Sarah Scannell

A new pedestrian crossing on Merrion Square North, Dublin 2 has been installed to enhance a new layout which now brings a shared bus and cycle lane up to the junction where it previously ended before the junction. The layout has also been and remarked to ensure a more direct cycle lane across the junction.
Merrion Street Layout Merrion Street markings
Merrion Street Ped Upgrade

Cycling & the Law

Posted 30 Jan 2017 to News by Sarah Scannell

 

Extract directly from Citizens Information website

If you are cycling in Ireland it is important that you are aware of the laws in place regarding cycling and the penalties in place if you break the law. The Road Traffic Acts 1961-2014 set out the main provisions for motoring and legislate for bicycles as well as mechanically propelled vehicles and trailers. There is also secondary legislation which regulates the behaviour of motorists and cyclists.

Bicycles

As well as those regulating cyclist behaviour, there are regulations setting out the equipment a bicycle must have.

Under the Road Traffic (Lighting of Vehicles) Regulations 1963 a bicycle ridden in a public place during lighting-up hours must be equipped with a rear red reflector, and with front and rear lights that can be seen from a reasonable distance. The front light must be white or yellow, while the rear light must be red. It is legal to use flashing lights. You can find more information in our document on lighting of bicycles.

Under the Road Traffic (Construction, Equipment and Use of Vehicles) Regulations 1963 a bicycle used in a public place must be fitted with a bell capable of being heard at a reasonable distance. It must also be equipped with brakes, one for the front wheel and another for the rear wheel.

Your bicycle and its equipment must be in good working order. Under Section 20 of the Road Traffic Act 1961, if a Garda, having tested your bicycle, has reasonable grounds for believing that your bicycle has a dangerous defect, the Garda may instruct you not to ride the bicycle in a public place until the defect is remedied. If you fail to do as requested, you are committing an offence.

Cycling

When cycling you must obey the rules set out in the Road Traffic Acts and Road Traffic (Traffic and Parking) Regulations 1997-2014.

For example, Article 11 of the Road Traffic (Traffic and Parking) (Amendment) (No. 2) Regulations 2012 prohibits you from cycling beyond a traffic sign that prohibits bicycles. Article 14 of the Road Traffic (Traffic & Parking) Regulations 1997 (as substituted by the 2012 Regulations) provides that where a cycle lane is provided, you must use it. If the cycle lane is a contra-flow cycle lane, you can only cycle in the contra-flow direction on it. Article 13 of the 1997 Regulations makes it an offence to cycle on a footpath unless you are entering or exiting a property. Under Article 45 of the 1997 Regulations (as amended by the Road Traffic (Traffic and Parking) (Amendment) Regulations 1998), you must not cycle in a pedestrianised street or area during the period indicated on the information plate accompanying the pedestrianised street or area traffic sign, unless you are cycling on a cycle lane.

Like other road users, cyclists must obey the rules applying to traffic lights, pedestrian crossings, zebra crossings and cycle traffic lights. You must stop at stop signs and yield right of way at yield signs.

Under Article 47 of the 1997 Regulations (as substituted by the 2012 Regulations), you must not cycle more than 2 abreast, except when overtaking and it does not endanger or obstruct other traffic. You can overtake a vehicle on the left where the vehicles to your right are stationary or are moving slower than you, except when the vehicle to be overtaken:

  • Has signalled an intention to turn to the left and will execute the movement to the left before you overtake it
  • Is stationary for the purpose of allowing a passenger to alight or board the vehicle
  • Is stationary for the purposes of loading or unloading

Section 100 of the Road Traffic Act 1961 makes it an offence to ride a bicycle while holding on to another moving vehicle (other than another bicycle which no one is riding).

Garda powers

A Garda can ask for your name, address and date of birth if you are suspected of:

  • Having committed an offence
  • Having been involved in a collision or other event in a public place causing injury or damage

If you refuse to give your details or give details which the Garda believes to be false or misleading, the Garda can take your bicycle and retain it until such time as your identity is proven.

A Garda can arrest you without a warrant:

  • If you are riding a bicycle while under the influence of alcohol and/or drugs so that you do not have proper control of the bicycle
  • If the Garda has reasonable grounds for believing that you are riding a bicycle without the owner’s consent

Penalties

If you are charged with a cycling offence, you will have to attend court. In general, if you are guilty of a cycling offence, you are liable on summary conviction:

  • In the case of a first offence to a class D fine
  • In the case of a second or subsequent such offence to a class C fine

In the case of 3 or more such offences in a 12-month period you are liable to a class C fine or to imprisonment for up to 3 months, or to both a fine and imprisonment.

If you are convicted of riding a bicycle while under the influence of alcohol and/or drugs, you are liable on summary conviction to a class C fine.

Fixed charge offences

Under the Road Traffic (Fixed Charges Offences – Cyclists) Regulations 2015 (pdf) certain cycling offences have been declared to be fixed charge offences. The fixed charge system allows someone who has been detected committing a fixed charge offence to pay a fixed charge or fine as an alternative to going to court to answer the offence. The fixed charge for a cycling offence is set at €40.00.

Since 31 July 2015 the cycling offences to which a fixed charge applies are:

  • No front or rear light during lighting-up hours
  • Riding a bicycle without reasonable consideration
  • Failing to stop for a school warden sign
  • Failing to stop at traffic lights when the red lamp is lit
  • Failing to stop at cycle traffic lights when the red lamp is lit
  • Failing to stop at a stop line, barrier or half barrier at a railway level crossing, swing bridge or lifting bridge, when the red lamps are flashing.
  • Cycling in a pedestrianised street or area

If you receive a fixed charge notice, you have 28 days from the date of the issue of the fixed charge notice to pay the fine. If it is not paid within 28 days, the charge is increased by 50%. If it is still unpaid after a further 28 days then court proceedings are initiated.

If you misplace, lose or damage your fixed charge notice, you should contact the Garda Fixed Charge Processing Office (see ‘Where to apply’ below). A re-print of the notice will be sent to you by post. However, the time period allowed for payment is not extended by your request for a re-print.

If the fixed charge notice is paid within the legal time limits and court proceedings are not commenced, you will not have a criminal record in respect of the offence.

Helmets and Clothing

While it is not a legal requirement to wear high visibility clothing or a safety helmet, Dublin City Council along with the Road Safety Authority actively support, encourage and promote the wearing of helmets and high visibility clothing at all times when cycling anywhere at any time.

 

National Transport Authority Light Up campaign poster

National Transport Authority Light Up Campaign Poster

 

Clontarf to City Centre Cycle Route – Public Information Session

Posted 19 Jan 2017 to News by Sarah Scannell

 

Clontarf to City Centre Cycle Route Public Information Session

An informal Public Information Session will be held at Charleville Mall Public Library on Saturday February 11th 2017 from 10:00am to 1:00pm. Members of the design team, RPS Consulting Engineers, will be available to answer queries from the public on the scheme.

Fógra! Proposed works: Clontarf to City Centre Cycle Route

Posted 11 Jan 2017 to News by Sarah Scannell

Proposed Clontarf to City Centre Cycle Route. Clontarf Road/
Alfie Byrne Road, Dublin 3 to Amiens Street/Talbot Street, Dublin 1.

Pursuant to the requirements of the above, notice is hereby given of the
proposed construction by Dublin City Council of the above scheme, The
proposed works shall comprise of the construction of circa 2.5km of high
quality cycle facilities, improved footpaths and landscaping from Clontarf
Road / Alfie Byrne Road, via Clontarf Road, Marino Mart, Fairview,
Annesley Bridge Road, North Strand Road and Amiens Street.

The scheme will also include provision of a portion of the Tolka Valley
Greenway linking Alfie Byrne Road with Annesley Bridge Road. The
route shall traverse underneath Clontarf Road Railway Bridge, North
Strand Road Railway Bridge and Amiens Street Railway Bridge
(Protected Structures) and over Annesley Bridge at the Tolka River and
Newcomen Bridge at the Royal Canal (Protected Structures).
New Toucan (pedestrian and cycle) crossings shall be provided at the
following locations: Marino Mart (at Malahide Road); Marino Mart (at
Marino College); Fairview (near footbridge); Annesley Bridge Road
/ Cadogan Road; North Strand Road / Charleville Mall (Royal Canal
Greenway Route).

Existing pedestrian crossings shall be upgraded to Toucan crossings at the
following locations: Clontarf Road / Alfie Byrne Road; Clontarf Road /
Howth Road; Clontarf Road / Malahide Road; Annesley Bridge Road
/ Fairview Strand; North Strand Road / East Wall Road; North Strand
Road / Annesley Place; North Strand Road / Waterloo Avenue; Amiens
Street / Portland Row (5 Lamps); Amiens Street / Buckingham Street
Lower; Amiens Street / Talbot Street.

In addition, the proposed works shall include extensive landscaping,
removal and replanting of trees, a “greenway” along the front of Fairview
Park; improved public lighting and CCTV; cycle parking in Fairview Park;
relocation of some bus shelters; removal and relocation of car parking
spaces; relocation of road side retaining wall on the east side of North
Strand Road, north of Ossory Road; alteration to boundary wall of
Iarnród Éireann Head Office, Connolly Station, Amiens Street (Protected
Structure) and other ancillary services along the route.
The following reports also accompany this application:
• Appropriate Assessment Screening Report
• Built and Heritage Report
• Arborist (Tree Assessment) Report

Plans and particulars of the proposed development may be inspected (or
purchased at a fee not exceeding the reasonable cost of making a copy)
for a period of 6 weeks from Thursday, 12th January 2017 to Thursday,
23rd February 2017 at the offices of Dublin City Council, Public
Counter, Planning and Property Development Department, Block 4,
Ground Floor, Civic Offices, Wood Quay, Dublin 8, Monday to Friday,
09.00hrs to 16.30hrs.

The proposal can also be viewed at the following locations:
1) Central Area Office, 51-53 Lower Sean MacDermott Street, Dublin
1. Opening Hours: 10.00hrs – 15.30hrs., Monday to Friday.
2) North Central Area Office, Bunratty Road, Coolock, Dublin 17.
Opening Hours: 10.00hrs – 15.30hrs., Monday to Friday.
3) Charleville Mall Library, Charleville Mall, North Strand, Dublin 1.
Opening Hours: 10.00 hrs – 13.00hrs. and 14.00hrs. – 17.00hrs.,
Monday to Saturday.
4) Marino Library, 14 – 20 Marino Mart, Fairview, Dublin 3. Opening
Hours: Monday and Wednesday from 12.45hrs to 16.00hrs and
from 16.45hrs – 20.00hrs. Tuesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday
from 10.00hrs – 13.00hrs and from 14.00hrs – 17.00hrs.

Plans and particulars can also be viewed online at www.dublincity.ie and
http://www.dublincity.ie/main-menu-services-planning-planning-news/clontarf-to-city-centre-cycle-route-part-8

A submission of observation in relation to the proposed development,
dealing with the proper planning and sustainable development of the area
in which the development would be situated may be made in writing to the
Executive Manager, Planning and Property Development Department,
Dublin City Council, Block 4, Floor 3, Civic Offices, Wood Quay, Dublin
8 before 16.30hrs on Thursday 9th March 2017.

Changes to Junction at North Strand Road & Ossory Road

Posted 9 Dec 2016 to News by Sarah Scannell

A new road layout has been installed at the junction of North Strand Road / Ossory Road as part of works at Newcomen Bridge, Dublin 3.  As part of this new installation the exit from Ossory Road is now signalised where there was previously only pedestrian crossing signalised lights.

Temporary notices will be displayed at the junction however it is important that road users note the new road layout and obey traffic signals. In particular, cyclists who use the route regularly will not be used to signalled traffic exiting from Ossory Road.

 

 

Dublin is Chosen to Host Velo-city 2019, European Cyclists’ Federation’s Annual Global Cycling Summit

Posted 9 Dec 2016 to Events by Sarah Scannell

dublin_bikes_lge_mvdl_4010

After Taipei, Arnhem-Nijmegen, and Rio de Janeiro, the European Cyclists’ Federation’s (ECF) Board announces that Dublin will be next in line to host the Velo-city conference series in 2019.

“We are excited to bring participants from all continents in 2019 to Dublin. Velo-city 2019 Dublin will – as all our Global Cycling Summits do – offer a great opportunity for sharing the experience, knowledge and expertise about the promotion of cycling worldwide,” says Bernhard Ensink, ECF Secretary General.

The bid, led by Dublin City Council, made a strong proposal with an integrated and collaborative team, and displayed strong political commitment on all levels, from local to national. In addition, Dublin has shown a big push for implementation from a behavioural and infrastructure perspective. The site visit showed the ECF team a clear willingness for collaboration and community engagement. For these reasons, the ECF Board has chosen Dublin as host for its global cycling summit.

Velo-city Series Director, Marcio Deslandes, said of the choice: “Dublin is a great example of a city moving towards a more livable, safe, and active environment for its citizens.”

This will not be the first time that Velo-city comes to Dublin; the conference was hosted very successfully here in 2005. “Velo-city 2005 proved a catalyst for cycling growth in the city – the number of cyclists in the city increased by 147% since 2005, but also the conference showed that cycling was a real and viable mode of transport for Dubliners,” says Owen P. Keegan, Chief Executive of Dublin City Council.

He added “Hosting Velo-city in Dublin in 2019 will accelerate the efforts by Dublin City Council and our partner agencies to further the development of Dublin as a world class cycling city.”

In relation to the announcement, Brendan O’Brien, Director of Traffic with Dublin City Council said: “Dublin’s theme for Velo City 2019 is Cycling for the Ages. We aim to encourage cycling by people of all ages, young and old, male and female and to promote the health, environmental, social and economic benefits of cycling. We also want to show the evolution of cycling in Dublin through the ages and into the future.

Dublin is a beautiful historic city known for its culture and hospitality. We look forward to welcoming delegates from all over the world to our city to share our experiences, successes and challenges in promoting and developing cycling during Velo City Dublin, 2019 and anticipate that, just as in 2005, hosting Velo City will be a game changer for cycling in Dublin.” 

The previous European Series of Velo-city attracted 1,500 delegates, at Velo-city 2015 in Nantes-France.  The next series of Velo-city will take place in Arnhem-Nijmegen, the Netherlands, from 13-16 June 2017.

 

Bicycle Anti-Theft Initiative Rathmines

Posted 28 Nov 2016 to News by Sarah Scannell

As part of a new Community Engagement Project, Probationer Gardaí from Rathmines Garda Station assisted by the Rathmines Community Policing Unit co-ordinated an anti-bicycle theft initiative. On Friday the 25th of November, members from Rathmines Garda Station placed an ‘Info Bike’ at the Swan Leisure Centre bicycle stand in the centre of Rathmines. This ‘Info Bike’ initiative has proven successful in other Garda districts as a significant deterrent to bicycle theft. Rathmines Gardaí also received assistance with the launch of this project from local Dublin City Council representatives including Public Officer Kevin O’Sullivan and Sarah Scannell Cycling and Walking Promotion Officer . An Garda Síochána Rathmines would like to thank all involved for their invaluable assistance in launching this initiative.

dscf0436

Red Lights Aren’t Optional

Posted 13 Oct 2016 to News by Sarah Scannell

red-lights-arent-optional

In September 2016 Dublin City Council engineer Will Mangan received 27 postcards from children in Saint Columba’s Primary School North Strand, Dublin 3.

The children in the senior classes 3rd – 6th had enough of the dangerous situation outside of their school at the pedestrian lights. On a daily basis red lights were being ignored by cyclists and cars while the children were crossing the road on a green pedestrian light. To add to this danger the junior room, consisting of much younger children, cross at this pedestrian crossing and the situation was becoming unmanageable. In order to tackle this issue the senior children took it upon themselves to individually write to engineer Will Mangan requesting solutions to this problem before someone got seriously injured or worse killed.

What arrived in to Will were 27 powerfully visualised postcards depicting the daily struggle the children from Saint Columba’s face arriving and leaving  school every day, and it did not paint a pretty picture.  While some images visualised a future where everyone obeyed the rules of the road more portrayed images of injuries, scared children and general chaos at the crossing outside their school. Each postcard contained a written message detailing the children’s daily experience and the fears they felt.

The postcards were received while An Garda Síochána was beginning to launch the 2016 ‘Safer Roads for Dublin’ campaign which coincidentally focused on red light running. Dublin City Council brought the postcards to the attention of An Garda Síochána and after viewing the postcards and obtaining permission from the children and their Principal Ann Creaner, An Garda Síochána, Road Safety Authority, Dublin Bus, LUAS, TII (Transport Infrastructure Ireland), National Transport Authority and all four Dublin Local Authorities in the 2016 Safer Roads for Dublin Campaign were delighted to showcase, support and endorse the children’s messaging for the campaign launch.

At the Safer Roads for Dublin launch on the 10th October 2016 Chief Superintendent Aidan Reid, head of Dublin’s Traffic Corps, said:

“We are aiming this red light running campaign at all drivers, cyclists and pedestrians and appealing to them to reduce the risk to themselves and others by simply obeying the rules of the road when the traffic light is red. It seems a simple ask, and maybe a lesser offence, but when you consider there are 1,620 sets of traffic lights in Dublin, even one breach each day equals 1,620 potential collisions. Heed the message we are sending out today – Don’t gamble with your safety – red means stop for all!”

Chief Superintendent Reid continued:

“This campaign is all about reducing risks. Risks cause injury and fatalities on our roads. This year has seen 12 road deaths in Dublin, one more than in 2015 so we must re-double our efforts to ensure this does not increase further. A special word of thanks goes out to St Columba’s primary school for their contribution to road safety. It is initiatives like these that make a difference. So, like St Columba’s, we appeal to every road user to play their part to keep Dublin’s roads as safe as possible for all who use them.”

Helen Smirnova and Will Mangan oversaw engineering solutions to the issues faced by the children.

Extra signage to highlight the pedestrian crossing were installed, the Road Safety Unit organised two traffic wardens on site at St Columba’s School and a system to monitor cyclists red light running was introduced. Alterations to the traffic signals were made via the Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) section to make the junction more pedestrian friendly.

While all these measures are greatly welcomed the issue around individual user behaviour is not so easily solved. It is up to each of us that use the roads to ensure we do so in a safe and respectful manner and in accordance with the rules of the road. Red lights are there to be obeyed, to ensure the safety of other road users and as the picture below states ‘Red Lights Aren’t Optional’.  The potential harm that can arise from red light running by any road user cannot be underestimated. Everyone has a part to play in road safety, and even small actions can lead to big changes on our roads.

I would like to thank all the children and Principal Ann Creaner at Saint Columba’s, all the staff in the Environment and Transportation Department, An Garda Síochána and all the stakeholders involved in the ‘Safer Roads for Dublin’ campaign.

I will let the children’s messages speak for themselves…

 

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Contra Flow Lane at Kildare Street

Posted 3 Oct 2016 to News by Sarah Scannell

Due to Luas Cross City works on Dawson Street, Dublin 2 a new contra flow bus lane has been introduced on Kildare Street, Dublin 2.

It is important to pedestrians and cyclists in the area to note these changes as there is now significant bus traffic coming northbound on Kildare Street.

The biggest changes will be for cyclists turning right from Nassau Street as cyclists need to ensure they keep to the left lane when entering Kildare Street. It is important that cyclists position themselves correctly either in front or behind traffic when making this turn.

Pedestrians will need to look both left and right at Kildare Street when crossing on the green light at pedestrian crossings.

New markings at Nassau Street to warn cyclists turning right on contra flow Bus Lane

New markings at Nassau Street to warn cyclists turning right of contra flow bus lane.

Change to junction turning right from Nassau Street up Kildare Street

Change to junction turning right from Nassau Street up Kildare Street.